Sunday, January 10, 2016

Riverwalk Exploration Trail

The Riverwalk Exploration Trail is a paved trail that runs along the western shore of the Colorado River from a point just south of Highway 163 north to the Pyramid Canyon Day Use Area at the Davis Dam. There are 3 access points to the trail. The southernmost trailhead is just west of Casino Boulevard and south of Highway 163. The second access point is reached by turning off Highway 163 just west of Casino Boulevard. The third is reached by taking Davis Dam Road, farther west off Highway 163. Total distance of the trail is just over 2 miles from the southernmost trailhead to the northernmost.


Restrooms located at the trailhead. Such Restrooms are located at all trailheads along the route.
Pedestrian bridge over Highway 163.
Pedestrian bridge.

The entire trail is paved, and informational kiosks are scattered along the route. Motorized vehicles are not allowed on the trail, but you will encounter plenty of bicyclists. The trail is very popular, and we were always within sight of someone else. For the most part, the trail is level and easy.


It was a sunny day when Donna and I walked the trail. Numerous planes and helicopters were buzzing about the skies, using the nearby Bullhead City airport as a base of operations.

The highlight of the walk is Davis Dam, which forms Lake Mohave. Davis Dam is located 67 miles south of Hoover Dam, and re-regulates the waters released from Lake Mead via Hoover Dam. Construction of Davis Dam began in 1942. After a brief delay during WWII, construction resumed in 1946. Workers employed to build the dam, as well as their families, lived in 2 camps. The camp along the west side of the river eventually became Laughlin, Nevada, while the camp along the east side of the river grew into Bullhead City, Arizona. The camps were actually small towns, consisting of homes, business, churches, and schools.


The Colorado River is a source of life in this arid part of the country. Three desert ecosystems actually converge on the lower Colorado River basin: the Sonoran, the Great Basin, and the Mojave. These systems actually contain a great range of wildlife and plants. Additionally, the area has traditionally seen a great deal of mining activity, such as in nearby Oatman, Arizona, (see recent post) and Searchlight, Nevada. Ranching is also a major activity, with federal lands being leased and used for grazing. Limited farming along the river is also possible, with large fields of alfalfa, for example, on reservation lands near the Avi Casino, where we recently stayed.


Steamboats once plied the waters of the Colorado River all the way from the Gulf of California to Callville, a town now resting at the bottom of Lake Mead. The steamboats delivered supplies to miners and businesses along the river.

This is a good and safe place to walk. We enjoyed our 4 mile round trip.


The entire trail is paved.
This day use Park on the Arizona side is basically about where one of the construction camps was located.


The entire trail is paved, and informational kiosks are scattered along the route. Motorized vehicles are not allowed on the trail, but you will encounter plenty of bicyclists. The trail is very popular, and we were always within sight of someone else. For the most part, the trail is level and easy.
Informational kiosks such as this are located all along the trail.
The Davis Dam, which forms Lake Mohave.

The Pedestrian bridge where it crosses Highway 163. Local casinos are in the background.

The Laughlin Bridge, which connects Bullhead City, Arizona, to Laughlin, Nevada.



It was a sunny day when Donna and I walked the trail. Numerous planes and helicopters were buzzing about the skies, using the nearby Bullhead City airport as a base of operations.

The highlight of the walk is Davis Dam, which forms Lake Mohave. Davis Dam is located 67 miles south of Hoover Dam, and re-regulates the waters released from Lake Mead via Hoover Dam. Construction of Davis Dam began in 1942. After a brief delay during WWII, construction resumed in 1946. Workers employed to build the dam, as well as their families, lived in 2 camps. The camp along the west side of the river eventually became Laughlin, Nevada, while the camp along the east side of the river grew into Bullhead City, Arizona. The camps were actually small towns, consisting of homes, business, churches, and schools.


The Colorado River is a source of life in this arid part of the country. Three desert ecosystems actually converge on the lower Colorado River basin: the Sonoran, the Great Basin, and the Mojave. These systems actually contain a great range of wildlife and plants. Additionally, the area has traditionally seen a great deal of mining activity, such as in nearby Oatman, Arizona, (see recent post) and Searchlight, Nevada. Ranching is also a major activity, with federal lands being leased and used for grazing. Limited farming along the river is also possible, with large fields of alfalfa, for example, on reservation lands near the Avi Casino, where we recently stayed.


Steamboats once plied the waters of the Colorado River all the way from the Gulf of California to Callville, a town now resting at the bottom of Lake Mead. The steamboats delivered supplies to miners and businesses along the river.

This is a good and safe place to walk. We enjoyed our 4 mile round trip.

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